Tag Archives: Wm. Low

Monifieth Tales – Fact or Fiction

By Mhairi Pyott

Over many years I have read or been told of incidents and happenings associated with people from the Monifieth area.

You may judge for yourself as to the accuracy of such tales and events written in this recorded version.

Certainly some articles are factually correct, others, well you are left to make your own decision.

Hopefully you will be entertained by reading Monifieth Tales, Fact or Fiction

 

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Low and Duff Brassfounders – The Little Foundry

Low and Duff from the air

Low and Duff from the air

 

To understand why the `little foundry`, as it was known to generations of Monifieth people, as opposed to the `big foundry` we must go back in time to the mid nineteen hundreds.

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J F Low Ironfounders – the Foundry by the sea

By Mhairi Pyott

In 1794 there was recorded in Monifieth 38 weavers of coarse linen, Osnaburg cloth, the name derived from Osnaburg in Germany, where the brown coloured linen cloth was first produced. Those weavers worked from home on a part time basis as they also farmed land.
At the start of the nineteenth century a partnership was formed by Robert Baxter & Robert Fairweather, establishing a spinning mill, driven by the Dighty water at what was then to be known as Milton of Monifieth.
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Monifieth – A Brief History

Ardestie Souterrain

Ardestie Souterrain

In prehistoric times it is said the only collection of human dwellings, in what we know today as Scotland was to be found at Ardestie Monifieth, Angus. Evidence of these `homes` can still be seen today.

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Monifieth Heritage Walk Leaving from the Angus Council Access Office.

First Monifieth Burgh Coat of Arms

First Monifieth Burgh Coat of Arms

Over the centuries the spelling of the name has altered many times, as has the conclusions as to the possible reasons for the title. The registered coat of arms carries the features of a stag and a hill, signifying the combination of two Gaelic words Monadh Feidh. However, many are now more in favour of another two similar sounding Gaelic words Monach Fother meaning Monks Land or Holy Place. Over the passage of time Monifieth has indeed been regarded as a historical holy place.
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What the Papers said

Here are some stories and reports from local newspapers over the years:

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