Category Archives: Names

Low and Duff Brassfounders – The Little Foundry

Low and Duff from the air

Low and Duff from the air

 

To understand why the `little foundry`, as it was known to generations of Monifieth people, as opposed to the `big foundry` we must go back in time to the mid nineteen hundreds.

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The Wishing Well

Balmossie Den

At the Wishing Well

At the Wishing Well

Balmossie Bridge spans the eastern entrance to the grounds of Linlathen House. On the banks of the Dighty Burn stands a well known locally as the “CAULD WATER WELLIE” and “THE WISHING WELL”. Though originally it was called the “CAT CRAIG WELL” from the name of the rock above it.  A stone at the site of the well is inscribed.

“Whosoever drinketh of the water shall thirst again T.E 1847”

The Wishing Well  c1911

The Wishing Well c1911

Thomas Erskine had the stone erected on the supposed site of a medieval holy well.

The well today.

Wishing Well Today

Wishing Well Today

The Rt Hon Lord Peter Fraser of Carmyllie QC

It was a very solemn occasion when we learned of the sudden death of the Patron of Monifieth Local History Society, Lord Peter Fraser of Carmyllie. We were indeed very privileged to have been one of the groups to have been within the broad spectrum of his many interests. An interna­tionally acclaimed politician, man of the law, sportsman, family man, who still managed to find time for those from the local area, such as MLHS.

His knowledge of the Heritage of Angus , in particular the light­houses , he willingly shared with others.

A great man of many interests and parts , he was most of all a ” Man of the People” who will be sadly missed by them, Never forgotten.

Lord Peter Fraser of Carmyllie

Lord Peter Fraser of Carmyllie

Milton of Monifieth

The bridge over the Dighty, at Monifieth has certainly been a crossing point for many centuries.  Since the 15th century, it has been regarded as a strategic crossing, and in the eighteenth century it became a favourite of French smugglers.
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J F Low Ironfounders – the Foundry by the sea

By Mhairi Pyott

In 1794 there was recorded in Monifieth 38 weavers of coarse linen, Osnaburg cloth, the name derived from Osnaburg in Germany, where the brown coloured linen cloth was first produced. Those weavers worked from home on a part time basis as they also farmed land.
At the start of the nineteenth century a partnership was formed by Robert Baxter & Robert Fairweather, establishing a spinning mill, driven by the Dighty water at what was then to be known as Milton of Monifieth.
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Ardestie Castle

About half a mile to the east of Monifieth near to Ardestie farm, there stands on an elevated piece of ground cottages. Currently this is the site of boarding kennels known as Ashbank. The place itself presents no striking picturesque features but commands a wide and varied view. Continue reading

A Romantic Adventure of Two Old Monifieth Communion Cups

This is the romantic story of two old Communion Cups belonging to St. Rules Parish Church Monifieth.

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